In case you missed it, we turned 40 in July! It got us thinking – are there any other Derbys out there? Well, after some research we discovered a whopping 23 other places called Derby across the globe. Many of them are in the United States and have been named after our city. Below, we’ve explored 15 of them!

  1. Derby, Wise County, Virginia, USA – Situated just a few miles east of the border with Kentucky, this Derby is home to a small unincorporated community and coal town. The town also sits at a relatively high elevation of 2,031ft compared to here: we sit just 211ft above sea-level.
  2. Derby, Frio County, Texas, USA – Formed in 1879 by John Bennett, the small Texan hamlet with a population of just 50 people sits in the south of the state. Originally the town had been called Lenore, but was later renamed to Derby after John Bennett’s home town in the UK.
  3. Derby, Pickaway County, Ohio, USA – This Derby is a small town outside of the Ohio state capital, Columbus, and forms part of the Darby Township. A post office was first established in the town in 1881. Like our Derby, one of its main roads is called London Road.
  4. Derby, Jackson Springs, North Carolina, USA – Although not technically a town, the fields surrounding the main road, Derby Road, are used to house a large solar energy farm alongside fields that produce more conventional produce like vegetables.
  5. Derby, Erie County, New York – This small hamlet is just 18 miles south-west of the major city of Buffalo and is situated on the shores of Lake Erie. This was the area of choice for wealthy Buffalo families to build their summer estates, following World War One.
  6. Derby, St Francois County, Missouri, USA – This small unincorporated community took its name from the Derby Lead Company. It sits on the outskirts of the larger town of Elvins. The area is well known for its historic lead mining.
  7. Derby, Berrien County, Michigan, USA – Part of the larger Lincoln Charter Township, this Derby sits under four miles from the coast of Lake Michigan and is just a 1 hour and 40 minute drive to Chicago. The surrounding area has a relatively high population density owing to all the major cities that are in the area.
  8. Derby, Sedgewick County, Kansas, USA – With a population of 22,158, Derby KS is the largest suburb of the major city of Wichita and even counts as a city itself. Like here, the city has its own Council which is responsible for parks, roads and planning amongst other things.

    High Park, Derby, Kansas.
    High Park, Derby, Kansas.
  9. Derby, Lucas County, Iowa, USA – Despite only having a population of 115 at the last census, this small hamlet is considered a city. It is home to ‘Bundy’s Gentle Giants Royal Rabbitry’: a specialist breeder that breeds Flemish Giant rabbits, an especially large breed of rabbit.
  10. Derby, Perry County, Indiana, USA – This small unincorporated community sits on the banks of the Ohio River on the border with Kentucky. Like Derby in Texas, this community was also named after Derby, England. The area has its own post office, general store and boat storage.
  11. Derby, New Haven County, Connecticut, USA – Settled in 1642 the city was first called Paugasset but was later renamed to Derby (after our English equivalent) in 1675. The city motto is ‘Connecticut’s smallest city’ but despite this it has its own high school and Mayor. In the 19th century both corsets and hoop skirts were manufactured in the city.
  12. Derby, Adams County, Colorado, USA – This Derby forms part of the huge Denver city area and, as with other USA Derbys, it was named after Derby, England. Just to the east is the huge Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge – 72 acres of natural habitat which is home to over 120 species of animals.
  13. Derby, Kimberly region, Western Australia – This small town on the coast of Western Australia is one of the three largest in the region. Despite only having a population of just under 5,000 it has its own airport and a large Boab tree that was once used as a prison.
  14. Derby, Tasmania – Made famous for tin mining in the late 1800s, this small town on the Island of Tasmania is surrounded by hills. The town recently become the stage for the Enduro World series, a premiere mountain biking race. It is thought that the town was named after Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom between June 1866 and 1868.
  15. Derby, North West Province, South Africa – This small South African town near Johannesburg was named after a former British Secretary of State, Lord Derby (Edward Stanley, 15th Earl of Derby) – the son of 14th Earl of Derby.