Council tax bills are increasing by 4.99% – made up of a 1.99% Council increase, plus an additional 3% authorised by the Government to help fund adult social care. Because of an aging population, the additional costs of adult social care to the Council will be almost £14m by 2020.

The table below shows the impact for each type of household.

Type of property 2016/17 2017/18(1) Annual change Weekly change* Council 1.99% increase* 3% social care increase*
Band A £824.31 £865.45 £41.14 79p £16.41 £24.73
Band B £961.70 £1,009.69 £47.99 92p £19.14 £28.85
Band C £1,099.08 £1,153.93 £54.85 £1.05 £21.87 £32.98
Band D £1,236.47 £1,298.17 £61.70 £1.19 £24.61 £37.09
Band E £1,511.24 £1,586.65 £75.41 £1.45 £30.07 £45.34
Band F £1,786.01 £1,875.13 £89.12 £1.71 £35.54 £53.58
Band G £2,060.78 £2,163.62 £102.84 £1.98 £41.01 £61.83
Band H £2,472.94 £2,596.34 £123.40 £2.37 £49.21 £74.19

*Figures rounded up or down to nearest penny

1 – Excluding Derbyshire Police & Crime Commissioner and Derbyshire Fire Authority charges

Derby’s council tax is low compared to other cities, meaning that less money is raised. For example, Derby’s income from the bill for a Band D home is £100 less than in Leicester – and £250 less than in Nottingham.

In addition, an usually high proportion of Derby homes (52% – more than half) are in Band A, which produces the lowest level of council tax income. For these reasons, it is not possible to raise enough from council tax to replace all the money lost through Government funding cuts. The result is that out of 151 local authorities, only 21 have less spending power than Derby. 

Read: Pledging a bright future for Derby

Budget numbers

  • £220m – The Council budget for 2017/18
  • £135m – Savings made since 2010
  • £28m – Additional savings needed in next 3 years
  • £71m – The reduction in central Government grant to Derby since 2010
  • £850,000 – The amount raised by a 1% council tax increase

Published: Wednesday 1st March, 2017